Monthly Archives: April 2013

ARE YOU HAPPY?

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“One of the things I am really sure about is nothing will make you happy. Very few things I am really sure about. That is one of things I am really sure about. Nothing will make you happy. It may give you you a jolt. It may make you gleeful but it isn’t going to make you happy. What does that mean nothing will make you happy?

It means what it says: there is no thing that’s going to make a person happy. Most people think “gee, when I graduate then life will be great.” No. You graduate and that’s wonderful but life still ain’t great. “When I get married then life will be great.” Not true. “Well when I get divorced then it will be ok.” Or when I get promoted, whatever it is, when I get a new car. When I get a chance to go on this new vacation… All you have to do is to watch people on vacation and you can see very clearly vacations do not make people happy. No, no, no.

Most people live their lives working towards something, working for something, that they think is going to make them happy. And it’s really the Peggy Lee song “Is that all there is?”. No matter what it is you get that you think is going to make you happy I can promise you that in a very short time after you get it you’re gonna be well “Is that all there is? Is that all there is to that? You mean it’s not filling my life with joy?” Yes, that’s right it, it isn’t.

You have to bring happiness to life. You don’t get happiness out of life. What is there to be happy about? Nothing. When you can be happy about nothing. Just be happy. You know “I am happy” – those words are sacred. It’s like a declaration, it’s like a place from which I come, it’s like a stand I take upon myself. Its not I am pretending to be happy, it’s not I am acting happy. No. I am happy!”

– Werner Erhard

Forgiveness

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“People often don’t understand what is involved in forgiving.  They think that if somebody does something wrong, and you forgive them, that is like saying that it was alright to do it that time – but don’t dare do it again.  But life doesn’t work that way; and it’s stupid or hypocritical to forgive someone on that basis.  If somebody does something,  you can be sure that he or she will do it again.

“That is why I prefer to talk about ‘making space’ and ‘completion.’  To the extent that forgiveness is involved,  it is more like self-forgiving and self-acceptance.  When you forgive yourself for something, you have to create the space for that thing to exist.  For whatever you resist, and fail to make space for, will indeed manifest itself in you.

“Self-forgiving, and self- accepting, is an essential part of being complete in relationships.  If there is something about your past that you are ashamed of, or guilty about – if there is something in it that you are hanging on to – if there is something there that you are using to burden another person – that will prevent you from being complete in your relationships.

“In order to transcend having to be any particular type of person, you have to make it all right with yourself to be that type of person.  The moment when you really experience that you have created yourself being whatever way you are, at the same moment you will never have to be that way again.

“This self-forgiving, self-acceptance, goes hand in hand with forgiving others, making space for others, completing your relationships with others.  You cannot be complete in a relationship with any person whom you do not admire and respect as he or she is, and as he or she is not – rather than the way you think she is or would like her to be.  Love for a person is is acceptance of him or her the way he is and the way he is not.

“So long as you do not know who you really are, this will be difficult.  You may have to give up a lot of things to which you may be attached.  You may have to give up your resentments, your anger, your upset, your annoyance, your desire to punish.”

-Werner Erhard, from Werner Erhard, The Transformation of a Man, The Founding of est, by William Warren Bartley  III